3.8 Chapter 3 Recap

 

Key Takeaways

Quotations
  • are the exact words from a source
  • are put in quotation marks (or block format if longer)
  • are used as material evidence to support your claims; to help the reader better understand what you are referring to; when the original language is especially moving, descriptive, or historically significant; and to accurately convey the meaning of unique terms or a passage that cannot be paraphrased or summarized adequately
Paraphrases
  • are restatements in your own words that maintain the meaning of the original passage
  • are approximately the same level of detail as the original
  • are used to demonstrate your mastery of the material, maintain a consistent voice, and express an idea more persuasively than in the original source

Summaries

  • are restatements in your own words that highlight the main points of a source
  • are much shorter than the original
  • are used to demonstrate your mastery of the material and convey the highlights of a longer text
Avoid plagiarism by
  • placing quotations in quotation marks
  • ensuring paraphrases or summaries are written in your own words and not too similar to the original
  • citing the sources of quotations, paraphrases, or summaries

When taking notes

  • write down the citation information for all the sources you consult
  • distinguish between what you took from the sources and what are your own thoughts

 

License

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Academic Integrity Handbook by Donnie Calabrese; Emma Russell; Jasmine Hoover; and Tammy Byrne is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 4.0 International License, except where otherwise noted.

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